Samaritanism is my expression of Torah observance; and to the best of my knowledge, I am one of only three other people in the UK to share that tradition. Given that the UK is a nation of well over 60 million people, it is an extraordinary position to be in, and comes with all the highs and lows one might expect for any pioneer.
  • Educator am Various locations
  • Lebt in Derby
  • Von Spondon
  • Male
  • anschliessend 7 people
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  • The attached screenshots are taken from the book Three Months' Residence at Nablus: And an Account of the Modern Samaritans, by John Mills.

    In the text featured in one of the shots, Amram Ben Shalmah, Samaritan High Priest between the years 1855-1874, confirms the tradition that the Jews are Edomites. A second shot confirms that it is unlawful for a Samaritan to marry a Jew.
    The attached screenshots are taken from the book Three Months' Residence at Nablus: And an Account of the Modern Samaritans, by John Mills. In the text featured in one of the shots, Amram Ben Shalmah, Samaritan High Priest between the years 1855-1874, confirms the tradition that the Jews are Edomites. A second shot confirms that it is unlawful for a Samaritan to marry a Jew.
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  • The Opinion of Traditional Samaritanism Regarding Jews.

    -Scott (Tsaafon) Morgan.
    The Opinion of Traditional Samaritanism Regarding Jews. -Scott (Tsaafon) Morgan.
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  • The Israelite-Samaritan community is the inheritor and guardian of the written Law of Moses, revealed to the entire Israelite nation during its forty years of wandering in the desert wildernesses of Egypt and Arabia, and heirs to the worship and covenants of Shehmaa, God of the world's first monotheist, The Adam. The modern Israelite-Samaritans retain much in common with the ancient Israelites, their progenitors. True to their predecessors, this ethno-religious community considers the written Law of Moses- the compiled texts of the books Genesis (Gen.), Exodus (Exo.), Leviticus (Lev.), Numbers (Num.) and Deuteronomy (Dt.) – alone to be the inspired, authoritative words of Shehmaa. In theory, they neither add to, nor take away from, the written text (Dt. 4:6).

    The Israelite-Samaritan community of Kiryat Luza, located in Palestinian Authority administered Nablus, is comprised predominantly of five clans, from several Israelite tribes. Among their number are those who possess genealogical histories leading back over 120 generations to the time of Moses, and not a few have a recorded ancestry that is uninterrupted all the way back to The Adam, eighth-day man (Gen. 2). While certain innovations have arisen among the community since 1624, the Israelite-Samaritans continue to adhere to a far more literal interpretation of the Law of Moses than the Jew, who, with the exception of the small community of Karaites, places emphasis on the teachings contained in their Talmud, and not the Law of Moses. Consider as a case-in-point, that the entire community of Israelite-Samaritans in Canaan maintains to observe the Passover Sacrifice, once a year, on mt. Gerizim; in contrast, the Jew, of any denomination, does not perform this foundational sacrifice, despite the command that it is to be performed by the entire Israelite nation, every year, in perpetuity (Exo. 12:42, 47, 49, 50; Num. 9:13-14).

    Neo-Samaritanism can, in reality, become a reform movement within Samaritanism, seeking a return to the traditional Samaritanism of pre-1624, when the last-known High Priest of the line of Phineas, grandson of the first High Priest, disappeared, leaving no male heir. Neo-Samaritans can continue to recognise all that is good of Samaritanism post-1624, while jettisoning all that is a product of innovations imposed by the line of Itamar. This is a great freedom, and it comes with great responsibility and monumental opportunity. Neo-Samaritans can be the pioneers of restoration, in our time.

    - Scott Morgan (Tsaafon).
    The Israelite-Samaritan community is the inheritor and guardian of the written Law of Moses, revealed to the entire Israelite nation during its forty years of wandering in the desert wildernesses of Egypt and Arabia, and heirs to the worship and covenants of Shehmaa, God of the world's first monotheist, The Adam. The modern Israelite-Samaritans retain much in common with the ancient Israelites, their progenitors. True to their predecessors, this ethno-religious community considers the written Law of Moses- the compiled texts of the books Genesis (Gen.), Exodus (Exo.), Leviticus (Lev.), Numbers (Num.) and Deuteronomy (Dt.) – alone to be the inspired, authoritative words of Shehmaa. In theory, they neither add to, nor take away from, the written text (Dt. 4:6). The Israelite-Samaritan community of Kiryat Luza, located in Palestinian Authority administered Nablus, is comprised predominantly of five clans, from several Israelite tribes. Among their number are those who possess genealogical histories leading back over 120 generations to the time of Moses, and not a few have a recorded ancestry that is uninterrupted all the way back to The Adam, eighth-day man (Gen. 2). While certain innovations have arisen among the community since 1624, the Israelite-Samaritans continue to adhere to a far more literal interpretation of the Law of Moses than the Jew, who, with the exception of the small community of Karaites, places emphasis on the teachings contained in their Talmud, and not the Law of Moses. Consider as a case-in-point, that the entire community of Israelite-Samaritans in Canaan maintains to observe the Passover Sacrifice, once a year, on mt. Gerizim; in contrast, the Jew, of any denomination, does not perform this foundational sacrifice, despite the command that it is to be performed by the entire Israelite nation, every year, in perpetuity (Exo. 12:42, 47, 49, 50; Num. 9:13-14). Neo-Samaritanism can, in reality, become a reform movement within Samaritanism, seeking a return to the traditional Samaritanism of pre-1624, when the last-known High Priest of the line of Phineas, grandson of the first High Priest, disappeared, leaving no male heir. Neo-Samaritans can continue to recognise all that is good of Samaritanism post-1624, while jettisoning all that is a product of innovations imposed by the line of Itamar. This is a great freedom, and it comes with great responsibility and monumental opportunity. Neo-Samaritans can be the pioneers of restoration, in our time. - Scott Morgan (Tsaafon).
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