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  • I have a question if anybody can help me out. I observed the Day of Atonement last year which included for me fasting and no fluids.. Is there a requirement to fast, and if so where is it stated in the Torah. I would appreciate a few opinions about this topic in relation to the Day of Atonement.
    I have a question if anybody can help me out. I observed the Day of Atonement last year which included for me fasting and no fluids.. Is there a requirement to fast, and if so where is it stated in the Torah. I would appreciate a few opinions about this topic in relation to the Day of Atonement.
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  • Where are some good sites to go for Torah teaching besides the usual rabbinical content?
    Where are some good sites to go for Torah teaching besides the usual rabbinical content?
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  • We've had a rough few years now, and the world seems to be changing in crazy and unbelievable ways. I'm going to offer a few polls to ask questions about peoples' perspectives.

    I wonder if certain extra-Torah philosophies are close matches within this small group or not. I think there are certain stances we might want to embrace as a group and encourage to be part of this community.

    If we differ widely, that's okay! I'm just wondering if there are sentiments among us that are similar and might become a part of a community's "platform" before we try to build a membership.

    Let's begin with a possible controversial poll about Covid-19 vaccines and others:
    We've had a rough few years now, and the world seems to be changing in crazy and unbelievable ways. I'm going to offer a few polls to ask questions about peoples' perspectives. I wonder if certain extra-Torah philosophies are close matches within this small group or not. I think there are certain stances we might want to embrace as a group and encourage to be part of this community. If we differ widely, that's okay! I'm just wondering if there are sentiments among us that are similar and might become a part of a community's "platform" before we try to build a membership. Let's begin with a possible controversial poll about Covid-19 vaccines and others:
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  • We're now down to a lean, mean 16 members in B'nei Moshe.

    The numbers are now about a quarter or less than the highest member count previously, but we're now aligned with the (corrected) Samaritan calendar.

    I will be working on the next Hebrew calendar soon! I've just looked up the vernal equinox, and this year the beginning is so close to the VE. In fact the new moon happens at 7:23 PM, while sundown is at 5:50 PM, so the official start of the new year begin at sundown on March 21st, 2023.

    I hope to calculate the Neo-Samaritan calendar this coming weekend.

    I've not been very active on the site for a bit, but I'll begin seeking new members and marketing the website os encourage new members in the near future.

    My business has been consuming much of my time, which I'm working to streamline so I can focus on this more.
    We're now down to a lean, mean 16 members in B'nei Moshe. The numbers are now about a quarter or less than the highest member count previously, but we're now aligned with the (corrected) Samaritan calendar. I will be working on the next Hebrew calendar soon! I've just looked up the vernal equinox, and this year the beginning is so close to the VE. In fact the new moon happens at 7:23 PM, while sundown is at 5:50 PM, so the official start of the new year begin at sundown on March 21st, 2023. I hope to calculate the Neo-Samaritan calendar this coming weekend. I've not been very active on the site for a bit, but I'll begin seeking new members and marketing the website os encourage new members in the near future. My business has been consuming much of my time, which I'm working to streamline so I can focus on this more.
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  • The attached screenshots are taken from the book Three Months' Residence at Nablus: And an Account of the Modern Samaritans, by John Mills.

    In the text featured in one of the shots, Amram Ben Shalmah, Samaritan High Priest between the years 1855-1874, confirms the tradition that the Jews are Edomites. A second shot confirms that it is unlawful for a Samaritan to marry a Jew.
    The attached screenshots are taken from the book Three Months' Residence at Nablus: And an Account of the Modern Samaritans, by John Mills. In the text featured in one of the shots, Amram Ben Shalmah, Samaritan High Priest between the years 1855-1874, confirms the tradition that the Jews are Edomites. A second shot confirms that it is unlawful for a Samaritan to marry a Jew.
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  • The Opinion of Traditional Samaritanism Regarding Jews.

    -Scott (Tsaafon) Morgan.
    The Opinion of Traditional Samaritanism Regarding Jews. -Scott (Tsaafon) Morgan.
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  • The Israelite-Samaritan community is the inheritor and guardian of the written Law of Moses, revealed to the entire Israelite nation during its forty years of wandering in the desert wildernesses of Egypt and Arabia, and heirs to the worship and covenants of Shehmaa, God of the world's first monotheist, The Adam. The modern Israelite-Samaritans retain much in common with the ancient Israelites, their progenitors. True to their predecessors, this ethno-religious community considers the written Law of Moses- the compiled texts of the books Genesis (Gen.), Exodus (Exo.), Leviticus (Lev.), Numbers (Num.) and Deuteronomy (Dt.) – alone to be the inspired, authoritative words of Shehmaa. In theory, they neither add to, nor take away from, the written text (Dt. 4:6).

    The Israelite-Samaritan community of Kiryat Luza, located in Palestinian Authority administered Nablus, is comprised predominantly of five clans, from several Israelite tribes. Among their number are those who possess genealogical histories leading back over 120 generations to the time of Moses, and not a few have a recorded ancestry that is uninterrupted all the way back to The Adam, eighth-day man (Gen. 2). While certain innovations have arisen among the community since 1624, the Israelite-Samaritans continue to adhere to a far more literal interpretation of the Law of Moses than the Jew, who, with the exception of the small community of Karaites, places emphasis on the teachings contained in their Talmud, and not the Law of Moses. Consider as a case-in-point, that the entire community of Israelite-Samaritans in Canaan maintains to observe the Passover Sacrifice, once a year, on mt. Gerizim; in contrast, the Jew, of any denomination, does not perform this foundational sacrifice, despite the command that it is to be performed by the entire Israelite nation, every year, in perpetuity (Exo. 12:42, 47, 49, 50; Num. 9:13-14).

    Neo-Samaritanism can, in reality, become a reform movement within Samaritanism, seeking a return to the traditional Samaritanism of pre-1624, when the last-known High Priest of the line of Phineas, grandson of the first High Priest, disappeared, leaving no male heir. Neo-Samaritans can continue to recognise all that is good of Samaritanism post-1624, while jettisoning all that is a product of innovations imposed by the line of Itamar. This is a great freedom, and it comes with great responsibility and monumental opportunity. Neo-Samaritans can be the pioneers of restoration, in our time.

    - Scott Morgan (Tsaafon).
    The Israelite-Samaritan community is the inheritor and guardian of the written Law of Moses, revealed to the entire Israelite nation during its forty years of wandering in the desert wildernesses of Egypt and Arabia, and heirs to the worship and covenants of Shehmaa, God of the world's first monotheist, The Adam. The modern Israelite-Samaritans retain much in common with the ancient Israelites, their progenitors. True to their predecessors, this ethno-religious community considers the written Law of Moses- the compiled texts of the books Genesis (Gen.), Exodus (Exo.), Leviticus (Lev.), Numbers (Num.) and Deuteronomy (Dt.) – alone to be the inspired, authoritative words of Shehmaa. In theory, they neither add to, nor take away from, the written text (Dt. 4:6). The Israelite-Samaritan community of Kiryat Luza, located in Palestinian Authority administered Nablus, is comprised predominantly of five clans, from several Israelite tribes. Among their number are those who possess genealogical histories leading back over 120 generations to the time of Moses, and not a few have a recorded ancestry that is uninterrupted all the way back to The Adam, eighth-day man (Gen. 2). While certain innovations have arisen among the community since 1624, the Israelite-Samaritans continue to adhere to a far more literal interpretation of the Law of Moses than the Jew, who, with the exception of the small community of Karaites, places emphasis on the teachings contained in their Talmud, and not the Law of Moses. Consider as a case-in-point, that the entire community of Israelite-Samaritans in Canaan maintains to observe the Passover Sacrifice, once a year, on mt. Gerizim; in contrast, the Jew, of any denomination, does not perform this foundational sacrifice, despite the command that it is to be performed by the entire Israelite nation, every year, in perpetuity (Exo. 12:42, 47, 49, 50; Num. 9:13-14). Neo-Samaritanism can, in reality, become a reform movement within Samaritanism, seeking a return to the traditional Samaritanism of pre-1624, when the last-known High Priest of the line of Phineas, grandson of the first High Priest, disappeared, leaving no male heir. Neo-Samaritans can continue to recognise all that is good of Samaritanism post-1624, while jettisoning all that is a product of innovations imposed by the line of Itamar. This is a great freedom, and it comes with great responsibility and monumental opportunity. Neo-Samaritans can be the pioneers of restoration, in our time. - Scott Morgan (Tsaafon).
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